Privacy Ref Blog

Don’t Take the Bait

Irony is a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.  So when I got a phone call asking to speak with Bob Siegel about his room for the upcoming IAPP Summit, I was surprised by the ironic situation I was faced with.  After all, one would expect that an event specifically about privacy would not be dealing with issues like phishing.

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Posted on February 29, 2016 by Ben Siegel - No Comments

 


Data Ages like Milk…

Very common questions we get from clients are how much information should they collect and how long they should keep it.  The standard answer is always to collect only what you need to do business and get rid of it when you no longer need it.  Now the questions become what information is truly needed and when is it no longer going to be used?

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Posted on February 23, 2016 by Ben Siegel - No Comments

 


Human Errors Will Create Privacy Issues

Regardless of the technology you put in place, the safeguards you have implemented, and the training you have provided, ultimately the success of your privacy program relies on the individuals in your organization. The most recent example of this came at the expense of the US National Women’s Soccer Team (USWNT). Continue reading this post…

Posted on February 8, 2016 by Bob Siegel - No Comments
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New Rules for Moving Data Across the Pond

Does your US organization do business in Europe? If so, the rules for collecting and moving the personal data of EU citizens across borders and into the US are about to change. A new EU regulation is taking shape under a tight deadline and intense pressure that will force changes to some common practices in the digital age which are regarded very differently by the two regions.

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Posted on February 5, 2016 by Kathy Stershic - No Comments

 


EU-US Privacy Shield is coming. Now what?

There seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel for organizations previously exporting personal information from the EU to the US under Safe Harbor, the EU-US Privacy Shield. Unfortunately the details of Privacy Shield are not yet available, so what is a privacy officer to do to prepare for utilizing the new agreement? Continue reading this post…

Posted on by Bob Siegel - No Comments
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All Steamed Up

Earlier this month, Valve experienced an issue with data caching and what some call a data breach.  Valve is a gaming company famous for many titles, but also for their virtual storefront, Steam.  The short story is that Valve’s virtual storefront, known as Steam, had a glitch that allowed someone logged in to potentially see another user’s personal information.  The personal information included names, digital identities, emails, and possibly credit card information.  For a more complete summary, check out this video.

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Posted on January 4, 2016 by Ben Siegel - No Comments

 


Three privacy thoughts to start 2016

Over the past few days I have been pondering everything that has happened in privacy in 2015 and the impact on organizations. My intent was to write a retrospective blog entry, but this morning I decided to look ahead and not in the rear-view mirror. So here are three thoughts to kickoff 2016. Continue reading this post…

Posted on December 31, 2015 by Bob Siegel - No Comments
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Privacy Impact Assessments: Organization-specific or Generic PIAs

I recently had a conversation with a colleague about privacy impact assessments, PIAs, and the tools available to administer them. We quickly became philosophical, trying to weigh whether a generic tool would work or if something that is organization specific is necessary.
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Posted on December 7, 2015 by Bob Siegel - No Comments
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Information Underload

For the holidays, I bought my wife a Samsung Gear Fit.  She is training for a 10k run and a half marathon next year, so she wants to track her progress prepare for these events.  When the Gear Fit arrived in the mail, my wife asked that I set it up for her while she was putting our son to sleep.  I got right to work playing with yet another piece of wearable tech, fumbling with it as I got it ready.  It was at the first stages that I was face to face with a crazy scenario.

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Posted on December 3, 2015 by Ben Siegel - No Comments

 


Police, Body Cameras, Privacy, and Policy

In the recent past a local police officer was involved in a shooting resulting in a citizen’s death. Soon after, the cry of “if only there was a body camera we would know what happened” was heard. I agree. However any police department needs to put policies in place to protect citizens’ privacy when cameras are used. Similarly, businesses using monitoring technologies need to put policies in place as well.
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Posted on October 29, 2015 by Bob Siegel - No Comments
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February 29, 2016

Don’t Take the Bait
Irony is a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.  So when I got a phone call asking to speak with Bob Siegel about his room for the upcoming IAPP Summit, I was surprised by the ironic situation I was faced with.  After all, one would expect that an event specifically about privacy would not be dealing with issues like phishing. Continue reading this post...

February 23, 2016

Data Ages like Milk…
Very common questions we get from clients are how much information should they collect and how long they should keep it.  The standard answer is always to collect only what you need to do business and get rid of it when you no longer need it.  Now the questions become what information is truly needed and when is it no longer going to be used? Continue reading this post...

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